COVID-19 and literature evidence: should we publish anything and everything?

COVID-19 and literature evidence: should we publish anything and everything?

Authors

  • Jeremy Chan Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, Coventry, UK
  • Shwe Oo Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK
  • Cheryl Yan Ting Chor St. George’s Medical School, University of London, London, SW17 0RE, UK
  • Daniel Yim St. George’s Medical School, University of London, London, SW17 0RE, UK
  • Jeffrey Shi Kai Chan Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
  • Amer Harky a:1:{s:5:"en_US";s:22:"Cardiothoracic Surgery";}

Keywords:

COVID-19, Review, Bibliometric analysis

Abstract

COVID-19 first presented in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. Since then, it has rapidly spread across the world, and is now formally considered a pandemic. As of 4th of May more than 3.2 million people have been infected and over 250,000 people has died. Since the very start, scientists and researchers have tried to utilize this case to publish academic experiences and suggestions toward fighting this virus, which is lethal in some cases. To date, more than 9,000 academic papers have been published since December 2019. The quality of publications varies from a plane letter to editor to randomized studies. This review aims to analyse the current published literature related to COVID-19 and assess the quality of such articles.

References

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Yu Y, Shi Q, Zheng P, Gao L, Li H, Tao P, et al. Assessment of the quality of systematic reviews on COVID-19: A comparative study of previous coronavirus outbreaks. J Med Virol. 2020.

Zou L, Ruan F, Huang M, Liang L, Huang H, Hong Z, et al. SARS-CoV-2 Viral Load in Upper Respiratory Specimens of Infected Patients. N Engl J Med. 2020;382(12):1177-9.

Chen H, Guo J, Wang C, Luo F, Yu X, Zhang W, et al. Clinical characteristics and intrauterine vertical transmission potential of COVID-19 infection in nine pregnant women: a retrospective review of medical records. Lancet. 2020;395(10226):809-15.

Vincent MJ, Bergeron E, Benjannet S, Erickson BR, Rollin PE, Ksiazek TG, et al. Chloroquine is a potent inhibitor of SARS coronavirus infection and spread. Virol J. 2005;2:69.

Ferner RE, Aronson JK. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in covid-19. BMJ. 2020;369:m1432.

Salehi S, Abedi A, Balakrishnan S, Gholamrezanezhad A. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): A Systematic Review of Imaging Findings in 919 Patients. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2020:1-7.

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Published

07-09-2020

Issue

Section

REVIEWS/FOCUS ON - SPECIAL COVID19

How to Cite

1.
Chan J, Oo S, Chor CYT, Yim D, Chan JSK, Harky A. COVID-19 and literature evidence: should we publish anything and everything?. Acta Biomed [Internet]. 2020 Sep. 7 [cited 2024 Jul. 20];91(3):e2020020. Available from: https://www.mattioli1885journals.com/index.php/actabiomedica/article/view/9827